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A photojournalist who captured footage of people escaping from Mariupol said he saw taped cars, fleeing vehicles with a sign that read “baby” and people in tears.

A photojournalist who captured footage of people escaping from Mariupol said he saw taped cars, fleeing vehicles with a sign that read "baby" and people in tears.

People wait at the Zaporizhzhya State Circus to be transported to other parts of the city on March 16.EMRE CAYLAK/AFP via Getty Images.

  • A photojournalist captured images of people fleeing the besieged city of Mariupol.

  • Emre Caylak said he saw several cars with white ribbons and a sign reading “baby”.

  • Mariupol was bombarded and a number of public buildings were destroyed.

A photojournalist who filmed people fleeing Mariupol said he saw long lines of damaged cars fleeing the city; some wearing white ribbons and paper signs with the word “baby” on them.

Emre Caylak photographed these images of Ukrainians arriving from Mariupol at a shopping mall in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine on March 16.

The mall – located about two hours from Mariupol by car – had been turned into a registration centre, where people volunteered to process those fleeing the besieged city.

The city is shelled by Russian fighters, who have targeted and destroyed public buildings, including a theatre, maternity and art school, according to city officials.

About 4,000 people – including those photographed by Emre – had fled Mariupol for Zaporizhzhia, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said on Sunday. About 100,000 people were still trapped in the city without food, water, electricity or medical supplies, he later said in a speech posted on Telegram.

The cars had white ribbons and signs saying babies traveled inside

Emre said the cars had white ribbons tied and window signs saying

Emre said the cars had white ribbons tied and window signs saying “baby”.EMRE CAYLAK/AFP via Getty Images.

The photojournalist said there was a line of about 20 to 30 cars at the entrance to the large mall, all filled with people, their pets and their belongings.

“Most of the cars coming in had a lot of people in them, 4 cars seated sometimes had 6 people…every space was full of stuff. People were just trying to fit in as much as they could,” he said. told Insider.

Emre said almost every car he saw had white tape tied to their mirrors and a paper sign taped to the window with the word “baby” on it.

People arrived in cars and trucks loaded with belongings and pets

People were arriving with their belongings loaded onto trucks.  Emre said that this woman kept on

People were arriving with their belongings loaded onto trucks. Emre said this woman kept “crying from time to time”.EMRE CAYLAK/AFP via Getty Images.

The photojournalist said people were often “too emotional” to talk to him. Those he spoke to said they had to make long journeys – about two days by car – from Mariupol to Zaporizhzhia, and were often stopped along the way by Russian fighters.

Many had to spend nights sleeping in their cars, where they had to turn off the heater to save fuel, he told Insider.

“They didn’t have a lot of gas, so they didn’t really turn the heat on…it was very cold for them,” he said.

The woman pictured above arrived in a group of eight or nine people with a truckload of goods, Emre said. “At first she looked at me and smiled, then all of a sudden she started crying,” he added.

Cars were often bombed as they left Mariupol and had to be taped, Emre said

Emre said this image was a

Emre said this image was a “very common scene”. People taped up their cars, which had been damaged by explosions, he told Insider.EMRE CAYLAK/AFP via Getty Images.

People arrived at the mall parking lot by car, Emre said. Taped-up cars that had been destroyed by shelling were a “very common scene”, he said.

“They tape it all up, sometimes they use paper bags to put it in the windows,” Emre said.

Several ceasefire attempts in the port city have failed, making it harder for citizens to escape through safe routes.

Russian Ministry of Defense called on Ukrainian forces to surrender early Monday morning and offered to open humanitarian corridors, but Ukrainian officials – who rejected the request – accused Russia of bomb these passages.

People Emre spoke to told him their cars had been bombed “for no reason”.

Mariupol residents did not expect the invasion to happen, Emre said

Emre said this scene was also common.  "Many people brought their dogs and cats"  he told Insider.

Emre said this scene was also common. “A lot of people brought their dogs and cats,” he told Insider.EMRE CAYLAK/AFP via Getty Images.

Emre – who was in Mariupol a month before the February 24 invasion – said people had no heating and little food in the weeks following the attack.

“They say it was really cold there; they had hardly any heating for a long time. They didn’t have much food. One person told me they didn’t really eat meat; they didn’t find anything,” Emre said. Initiated.

People often hugged each other for warmth, he added.

Emre told Insider he had “good memories” of Mariupol the month before the invasion, adding that no one really believed the attack would happen. The photojournalist left town three days after the February 27 invasion.

The mall was crowded and people often started crying, Emre said.

A woman who fled Mariupol waited in the mall to speak with officers.  Emre said that often the elderly

A woman who fled Mariupol waited in the mall to speak with officers. Emre said old people often “start crying”.EMRE CAYLAK/AFP via Getty Images.

Inside the mall, Emre said the hallways were “really crowded.”

Shops were closed but people were able to get coffee and food, he said.

The woman pictured above was quite emotional, Emre told Insider.

“One second she was laughing and they were talking and then she would start crying and get very emotional. She did this three times in 10 or 15 minutes,” Emre added.

“A lot of people like that, especially older people, would start crying,” he said.

Read the original article at Business Intern